What Do I Do If I Haven’t Received My Tax Refund?

Follow These Steps To Track Your Refund
Follow These Steps To Track Your Refund

Filing your tax return was stressful, but now that it’s done you know the amount you’ve got coming and you can’t wait to get your hands on it. This is understandable; we all usually have that refund earmarked for something. That’s why it can be so frustrating when your tax refund doesn’t arrive on time. Read on to learn what to do if you’ve been waiting an exceptionally long time for your tax refund.

Gather Some Information

The first thing you should do when you have yet to receive your federal tax refund is to gather your social security number, filing status and the exact amount that you expect to get so you can check your return status online or over the phone. Having this information close at hand is necessary to start the process.

Check the Status of Your Return

It’s important to first check your return status before you check your refund status. You can do so over the phone or by logging in securely to your account on the IRS website. If you used an e-filing service to process your return, inquire about your status with that company. Many such services offer online log-ins where you can easily check your account. If you didn’t use an e-file service, you can call the IRS toll-free at 1-800-829-1040. If you are lucky to speak to an agent during your first call, hopefully they will be able to tell you if there was a delay, and what the cause was. Often, the return simply hasn’t been processed yet.

Once you’ve confirmed that your tax return has been processed, you can check your federal tax refund status. If you opted for a direct deposit into your bank account, call the bank and see if the check has been deposited. If it hasn’t, a quick way to check on your status is to use the Where’s My Refund? tool provided by the IRS and you can track where your refund is at any time. The site is updated every 24 hours in the evening, so you can start checking it the day after you e-file your return (or a month after you’ve mailed it in).  You can also call the IRS at 1-800-829-1954 to determine where your check is and why it’s taking so long.

Reasons for Delay

Tax season is a notoriously busy time for the IRS: people are filing taxes, refunds are being processed and issues are being sorted. If you wait to file close to the deadline of April 15th, you could wait longer than if you filed a month or two earlier. In some cases, refunds and identities can be stolen. If you suspect suspicious activity as the reason for your refund delay, contact the IRS immediately at 1-800-829-1040.

Often times, there are good reasons why your refund has been delayed. If you opted for a paper check from the IRS, expect to wait at least twice as long as if you did direct deposit. In order to minimize wait time in the future, plan on e-filing with a direct deposit option next year.

What If I Forgot To Include Information On My Taxes?

Forgot Something On Your Tax Return?  Don't Worry!
Forgot Something On Your Tax Return? Don’t Worry!

So, you worked hours on your tax return, gathered your documents, filed on time and you are now awaiting your tax refund with eager anticipation. All is well until that moment of mild terror when you realize you forgot to include a vital document or deduction on your taxes. Don’t panic: all is not lost. There are ways to include missed information on your taxes, even if you’ve already filed them.

File an Amended Tax Return

When you’ve omitted information on your return, the IRS allows you to file an Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return called Form 1040X. However, you can’t e-file amended returns; they’ll have to be submitted it in paper form which increases the wait time by many weeks for any potential additional refunds.

Reasons to File

There are lots of reasons you might need to file an amended tax return, but there are some things that don’t necessitate one. You’ll need to file a 1040X form if you have experienced a change in your filing status, income, credits or deductions. But you do not have to file if you caught a math error after the fact. The IRS is pretty good about catching these types of mistakes and usually adjust these automatically for you. For example, If you forgot to attach the proper tax forms and a W2 is missing,  there’s no need to file this amended form. You should get a request from the IRS requesting any missing items. The IRS can easily find income that you may have omitted from your tax return, but sometimes it can take a very long time for the IRS to notify you.  That means if you made an error where you underpaid your taxes in some manner, you will accrue penalties and interest until your tax liability is paid in full.  It could pay for you to file an amended return to minimize penalties & interests.  On the other hand,  the IRS isn’t as well-equipped for finding missing credits or deductions that you may have overlooked, and which could increase your refund.  In this case, don’t wait until you get a letter from the IRS looking for more information. Instead, be proactive and file the amended return.  After all it’s your money and the IRS does NOT have to pay you interest for holding onto your well deserved refunds.


You have three years from the original filing date to submit Form 1040X, or two years from the date of tax payment.   You’ll need to submit a separate 1040X form for each tax return you’re amending and mail them separately to the IRS. Also, don’t assume they are all being mailed to the same mailing address.  There are usually separate processing PO Boxes for each tax year you are amending.  If you plan on claiming more of a refund, you must wait until you get your original refund in the mail or via direct deposit before filing the 1040X. Again, keep in mind that amended refunds take awhile to process, so it could take up to 12 weeks before you receive anything. If you owe more taxes as a result of the amended return, pay what you owe right away to avoid fees and penalties from piling up, as the IRS will begin charging you based on the due date of your original tax return.

Track Your Status

Similar to tracking your original refund status, the IRS has a Where’s My Amended Return? tool (you can also check R&G Brenner’s Where’s My Refund page as we include State Refund links as well) that you can use to track your amended return’s status. Alternatively, you can call the IRS at 866-464-2050. Have your taxpayer identification number or social security number handy, along with your date of birth and zip code.

If you forgot to include some vital information on your tax return, follow the steps above to make sure you pay all the right taxes and get your full refund.  Or, simply contact an experience R&G Brenner tax professional today, and we’d be happy to assist you.