2015 Tax Season Delayed

Filing Season Delayed...AGAIN!
Filing Season Delayed…AGAIN!

R&G Brenner has just been informed by our commercial tax software provider, that the IRS has indicated that the 2015 tax season (for filing tax returns for tax year 2014) will be delayed AT LEAST until January 23, 2015.  This means the season could potentially be delayed even beyond 1/23.

While delaying the start of the tax season has become a routine occurrence, this tax season could prove to be especially difficult.  The recent spending agreement passed by congress and expected to be signed by President Obama, cuts the IRS Budget down to levels not seen since 1998:

It is a cynical recipe for a self-fulfilling disaster: Give the [IRS] more and more work. Cut its budget. Blame it for failing to do its job. Repeat…For context, in 1998, taxpayers filed about 125 million individual returns. Last year, the agency had to process 145 million.

The IRS Commissioner, John Koskinen, pleaded with members of congress to increase the IRS’ budget and to act quickly on deciding to renew or let multiple tax laws and patches expire…all of which fell upon deaf ears.  Mr. Koskinen has now dubbed the 2015 tax season “one of the most complicated filing seasons we’ve ever had”  The National Taxpayer Advocate was even more forceful, calling this season “misery” & “the worst filing season ever” for taxpayers.

If there was ever a year to have a tax professional on your financial team, this is it!  Contact an R&G Brenner professional today and we’ll help you tackle what is shaping up to be a very difficult tax season.


The filing season will commence on January 20th, 2015.

IRS Has Nearly $1 Billion In Unclaimed Refunds

$917 Million In Unclaimed Refunds
$917 Million In Unclaimed Refunds

The IRS currently has $917 Million for clients in unclaimed refunds for taxpayers just like you, that have not filed a 2009 tax return.  If these returns are not filed by the April, 15th deadline, your money then becomes the property of the U.S. treasury.  The most common reason for not filing a tax return is that many workers believe they did not make enough money to have to file a return. This very well may be true however, if you worked, you most likely had taxes taken out of your paycheck.  This could equate to hundreds or even thousands of dollars that the IRS will be putting into their pockets instead of yours.

If you did not file a 2009 tax return and you worked that year, you may be due a refund.  Please contact an R&G Brenner professional today, and we will help you determine if filing a tax return can get you back the cash you deserve.

Check out this article for more information.


IRS: Get Refund Info Every 24 Hours

The IRS Released the following video.  Please watch for some valuable Tax Refund procedure information.  Highlights include:

  • 9 out of 10 Refunds received within 21 days
  • Use IRS Mobile App “Wheres My Refund”
  • Refund information available as soon as 24 hours after submitted to IRS

Source: IRS.gov

Tax Filing Season Delayed Until Jan. 22 Or Later

IRS Delays Filing Season And Refunds…Again.

By: Robert McCabe

Congress might have averted the “fiscal cliff,” but its last-minute action has created some big headaches and questions for tax filers.

“There’s a couple of impacts that I’ve never seen – this is my 44th tax season,” said John Hewitt, founder of Virginia Beach-based Liberty Tax Service and Jackson Hewitt, two of the nation’s largest tax-preparation companies.

Those who want to file a 1040 form electronically – the option favored by more than 90 percent of taxpayers – can’t do that yet because the Internal Revenue Service hasn’t signed off on finalized forms.

“Right now, a 1040 can’t be released,” Hewitt said. “It has a watermark on it saying, ‘Do not file.’ “

Filing paper forms probably won’t be possible until the end of the month, he said.

Taxpayers who like to knock out their federal and state returns together – whether filing themselves or using a tax preparer – face further delays because many of the states that collect income taxes don’t have their forms ready either.

“Typically, as of Jan. 3, we would be ready to go and fully tested in all the states that have income taxes,” Hewitt said in an interview Thursday. “Well, this year, only about a dozen of the states are ready to go because they’ve all been waiting on the federal government to act before they can finalize their forms and tax rates and so forth.”

Virginia will be ready by Monday, Hewitt said.

An IRS spokesman said Thursday that he could not say when new forms would be approved or whether there would be any adjustment of key dates for tax filings.

“Those decisions are under way and should be coming out relatively quickly, so stay tuned,” he said.

New legislation such as the fiscal package just approved by Congress needs to be reviewed, and IRS computer systems need to be configured to adhere to the bill’s provisions, the IRS spokesman said.

“These things don’t happen in a matter of hours; it takes days.”

Months ago, the Internal Revenue Service set Jan. 22 as the start date for the filing of electronically transmitted, computer-generated tax returns – the latest start date since electronic filing began in the late 1980s, Hewitt said.

“Those people that want their money quickly, that want their money in just a couple of weeks, are going to get it a week later than at any time since electronic filing was invented 25 years ago,” he said.

Carolyn Buzek is a Jackson Hewitt franchisee with eight offices in the Hampton Roads area.

“The IRS gets a bum rap in a lot of cases,” she said, adding that “everybody blames them for why you can’t file.”

“Well, it’s really Congress that makes the decisions, and the IRS has to scramble and try to figure out when you have the wording,” Buzek said. “Some of this is getting pretty complicated.”

California-based Intuit, maker of TurboTax, offers both online and desktop products enabling taxpayers to file their own returns. Electronically completed forms are transmitted to the company, which sends them to the IRS when it’s ready to receive them, Ashley McMahon, a spokeswoman, said Thursday.

Both products include prompts instructing users to download updates.

Hewitt said one of the biggest burdens his company will face this year is having to deliver the bad news to some customers that they will be getting their refunds late.

“These are people who live paycheck to paycheck,” he said, adding that they typically get returns averaging about $3,000.

Another burden is internal, affecting the biggest component of Liberty’s workforce – about 100 computer programmers.

Typically, they get information in October from the states with income tax.

“They have from October to January to get ready,” Hewitt said of his company’s programming staff. “Well, now we have only a few weeks to get ready.”

Hewitt said U.S. taxpayers are facing a situation “unheard of in the annals of tax preparation.”

“I don’t think Congress really understood the impact of what’s going to happen with tax filing this season,” he said. “Maybe they didn’t care.”

Source: Pilotonline.com